©
kinopia:

"When I was a kid, I believed you would become a mermaid when you went in the water to swim".
I really loved the little mermaid as a kid growing up so I had the warped perception you became a mermaid when you entered the water ahaha. This is me learning to swim with my cousin! This piece is for a gallery show at work.

kinopia:

"When I was a kid, I believed you would become a mermaid when you went in the water to swim".

I really loved the little mermaid as a kid growing up so I had the warped perception you became a mermaid when you entered the water ahaha. This is me learning to swim with my cousin! This piece is for a gallery show at work.



“There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.” 



gutsanduppercuts:

Possibly kung fu cinema’s most talented lead woman, Moon Lee.

gutsanduppercuts:

Possibly kung fu cinema’s most talented lead woman, Moon Lee.



“Feminism in neoliberal hands becomes just another form of career progression: a way of moving “up,” not by not recognizing ceilings (and walls) but by assuming these ceilings (and walls) can disappear through individual persistence.” — Sara Ahmed, “Selfcare as Warfare



depressednmoderatelywelldressed:

coelasquid:

Whenever people point to Mary Shelley and say “a woman invented sci-fi you know” I just think “well, I mean, technically a woman invented the whole concept of authoring books as far as we can tell but hey who’s keeping track”

*cough* a black woman *cough*



“Ancient moon priestesses were called virgins. ‘Virgin’ meant not married, not belonging to a man - a woman who was ‘one-in-herself’. The very word derives from a Latin root meaning strength, force, skill; and was later applied to men: virle. Ishtar, Diana, Astarte, Isis were all all called virgin, which did not refer to sexual chastity, but sexual independence. And all great culture heroes of the past, mythic or historic, were said to be born of virgin mothers: Marduk, Gilgamesh, Buddha, Osiris, Dionysus, Genghis Khan, Jesus - they were all affirmed as sons of the Great Mother, of the Original One, their worldly power deriving from her. When the Hebrews used the word, and in the original Aramaic, it meant ‘maiden’ or ‘young woman’, with no connotations to sexual chastity. But later Christian translators could not conceive of the ‘Virgin Mary’ as a woman of independent sexuality, needless to say; they distorted the meaning into sexually pure, chaste, never touched.” —

Monica Sjoo, The Great Cosmic Mother: Rediscovering the Religion of the Earth  (via thewaking)

Literally the most important thing you will read today.

(via aesrettibeht)

#staywoke

(via diokpara)

NOPE. ‘Ancient moon priestesses’ - of what region? The moon is a pretty common figure for worship. They aren’t Roman, at least, because the only priestesses in Rome were the Vestal Virgins. These Vestal Virgins in fact didn’t belong to a man, making their freedom unparalleled in the Roman world. But, as the name implies, they worshiped Vesta, not Selene, and were required to remain chaste - on pain of death.

'Virgin' does not share a root with 'vir'. 'Vir' comes from PIE *wiHrós, cognate with Old English wer-; ‘virgin’ is from ‘virgo’, which is related to ‘virga’, green shoot, probably derived from PIE *wisgā, ‘flexible rod or stick’, possible cognate with Old Norse visk.

Neither Osiris nor Dionysus were said to be born of virgin mothers, and a cursory Google search isn’t bringing up anything for Marduk or Buddha either, and I think that’s sufficient to prove that the author doesn’t know what they’re on about here.

'Maiden' does, in fact, imply chastity in cultures where sex outside marriage is taboo. In Latin texts, one finds 'virgo' simply meaning 'unmarried girl', because the ideas were synonymous. More to the point, what 'original Aramaic'? The New Testament is written in Koine Greek, and the term used for Mary is παρθένος, ‘unmarried girl, virgin’.

In short: more fucking stupid ‘ancient matriarchal religion’ woo. Look, it’s a nice fantasy, but I personally could do with a little less ~mystical feminine~ and a little more hard evidence.

(via cerberusia)

(via keriarentikai)



ginevvra:


“Are you sure that’s a real spell?” said the girl. “Well, it’s not very good, is it? I’ve tried a few simple spells just for practice and it’s all worked for me. Nobody in my family’s magic at all, it was ever such a surprise when I got my letter, but I was ever so pleased, of course, I mean, it’s the very best school of witchcraft there is, I’ve heard – I’ve learned all our course books by heart, of course, I just hope it will be enough — I’m Hermione Granger, by the way, who are you?” 

hermione granger ⇝  jordan richardson

ginevvra:

“Are you sure that’s a real spell?” said the girl. “Well, it’s not very good, is it? I’ve tried a few simple spells just for practice and it’s all worked for me. Nobody in my family’s magic at all, it was ever such a surprise when I got my letter, but I was ever so pleased, of course, I mean, it’s the very best school of witchcraft there is, I’ve heard – I’ve learned all our course books by heart, of course, I just hope it will be enough — I’m Hermione Granger, by the way, who are you?

hermione granger ⇝  jordan richardson


They say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, so should we take as compliment this appropriated culture chicanery that beats off on our sexuality? Well personally, I feel this way: let’s untie our tongues and say fuck you, fuck you, and fuck you too! Because I’m a woman, not a flavour. I’m a woman not a flavour not the flavour of a woman, I will knock the taste out your motherfucking mouth if I don’t like your behaviour.

I’m not a flavour; I’m a woman.

” — Yellow Rage, I’m a Woman Not a Flavour (via rstarlings)



allthecanadianpolitics:

Family of missing First Nation teen fears for her safety

Members of a Winnipeg family say they’re afraid for the safety of 15-year-old Pretty Plume Cobiness.
According to a post on Facebook, Cobiness was last seen leaving Studio 393 in Portage Place wearing a black T-shirt with a white logo. The First Nation teen is approximately five feet six inches tall, weighs about 170 pounds, and has long brown hair.
Her brother, Pete Cobiness, says no one in her family has heard from her since Saturday. 
"You never know and if you’re in the city, that’s what really worries me — some crazy stuff goes on out here," he told CBC News on Tuesday.
Winnipeg police confirm that Cobiness was reported missing on Saturday, Aug. 16.
Her disappearance came just one day before the body of another 15-year-old girl, Tina Fontaine, was discovered in the Red River in Winnipeg.

This is tragic. ANOTHER missing aboriginal girl in Canada. Not even a day after Tina Fontaine was found, murdered.
Please signal boost!

allthecanadianpolitics:

Family of missing First Nation teen fears for her safety

Members of a Winnipeg family say they’re afraid for the safety of 15-year-old Pretty Plume Cobiness.

According to a post on Facebook, Cobiness was last seen leaving Studio 393 in Portage Place wearing a black T-shirt with a white logo. The First Nation teen is approximately five feet six inches tall, weighs about 170 pounds, and has long brown hair.

Her brother, Pete Cobiness, says no one in her family has heard from her since Saturday. 

"You never know and if you’re in the city, that’s what really worries me — some crazy stuff goes on out here," he told CBC News on Tuesday.

Winnipeg police confirm that Cobiness was reported missing on Saturday, Aug. 16.

Her disappearance came just one day before the body of another 15-year-old girl, Tina Fontaine, was discovered in the Red River in Winnipeg.

This is tragic. ANOTHER missing aboriginal girl in Canada. Not even a day after Tina Fontaine was found, murdered.

Please signal boost!



'Society should be horrified;' 15-year-old found dead in Winnipeg river 



terrasigillata:

caterinasforzas:


Huge thanks to my co-star Cynthia Addai Robinson, who gave her all over the past two years to make Naevia everything Crixus needed & desired. If the fans could only see the fun we had behind the scenes but also the sincerity of her performance based upon her own past. I can tell you that this was not part of the scene but in the moments that followed, as we both breathed away the emotions that inspired us in our final scene together.
 Access Hollywood: On the final day of filming the cast and crew paid tribute by doing a tribal Haka for you?
 Manu Bennett: Yeah, I was fortunate that they did use my death scene as my final scene on the show and the one thing about that particular scene is I had no [acting] choice for it. It was the one scene during four years of filming the show where I just really didn’t know how I was gonna play the scene. … It was a really difficult one, but then, when I asked Cynthia [Addai-Robinson, who played Naevia], what she thought about the scene, she told me she was basing it on the death of her father. … 
So when she told me that, I was very aware of how emotional she would be in that scene, so I kind of just looked at her in support and … that ended up being the right choice, because Crixus, in his death… he knew what was coming and he knew potentially what would happen to Naevia, [and] following that, she would need all the strength she could get, so I spent the whole time just sort of looking at her and feeling for her, rather than anything about myself. … We do this in acting, but until you totally give yourself up to another actor, you don’t really realize the strength of it.
 At the end of my scene I went over because she was crying, because she put herself through that emotional scene with her father, and so I went over and sort of put my head against her forehead … [It was] just a very truthful moment

#well this is just devastating

let me die

terrasigillata:

caterinasforzas:

Huge thanks to my co-star Cynthia Addai Robinson, who gave her all over the past two years to make Naevia everything Crixus needed & desired. If the fans could only see the fun we had behind the scenes but also the sincerity of her performance based upon her own past. I can tell you that this was not part of the scene but in the moments that followed, as we both breathed away the emotions that inspired us in our final scene together.

Access Hollywood: On the final day of filming the cast and crew paid tribute by doing a tribal Haka for you?

Manu Bennett: Yeah, I was fortunate that they did use my death scene as my final scene on the show and the one thing about that particular scene is I had no [acting] choice for it. It was the one scene during four years of filming the show where I just really didn’t know how I was gonna play the scene. … It was a really difficult one, but then, when I asked Cynthia [Addai-Robinson, who played Naevia], what she thought about the scene, she told me she was basing it on the death of her father. …

So when she told me that, I was very aware of how emotional she would be in that scene, so I kind of just looked at her in support and … that ended up being the right choice, because Crixus, in his death… he knew what was coming and he knew potentially what would happen to Naevia, [and] following that, she would need all the strength she could get, so I spent the whole time just sort of looking at her and feeling for her, rather than anything about myself. … We do this in acting, but until you totally give yourself up to another actor, you don’t really realize the strength of it.

At the end of my scene I went over because she was crying, because she put herself through that emotional scene with her father, and so I went over and sort of put my head against her forehead … [It was] just a very truthful moment

let me die



What Mayoral Candidates Want to Know About Art | politics | Torontoist 

The Toronto mayoral election is more than two months away, but voters have already had ample opportunity to hear their candidates debate. So Tuesday afternoon at the Theatre Centre on Queen Street West, debate organizers flipped the script: instead of the having candidates answer questions from experts and special interest groups, Art on the Ballot featured experts from Toronto’s art and design industries taking questions from the people running for office.

Responding to Ari Goldkind’s question about combatting “culture deserts”—areas where residents lack accessibility to the arts

Said Lobko, “I see a lot of great cultural life going on in areas other than the downtown, however with many, many more challenges in front of them. In the food desert nomenclature, the worddesertis the important one and it implies the absence of something. What those communities are absent of, it seems to me, is not spirit or culture, but they are absent of resources, affordability, good transportation connections, good food choices … and affordable space in which to celebrate and share their culture.”

Lobko returned the idea of community leadership being vital to the success of local arts programs:  “I think it’s most effective when there’s a grassroots, local initiative to create space and bring partnerships together that allow for the renewal of these communities,” he said. “Across North America we’re seeing examples [of this] that don’t lead to hyper-gentrification… Local stewardship is the best way to ensure long term sustainability.”