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allthecanadianpolitics:

Family of missing First Nation teen fears for her safety

Members of a Winnipeg family say they’re afraid for the safety of 15-year-old Pretty Plume Cobiness.
According to a post on Facebook, Cobiness was last seen leaving Studio 393 in Portage Place wearing a black T-shirt with a white logo. The First Nation teen is approximately five feet six inches tall, weighs about 170 pounds, and has long brown hair.
Her brother, Pete Cobiness, says no one in her family has heard from her since Saturday. 
"You never know and if you’re in the city, that’s what really worries me — some crazy stuff goes on out here," he told CBC News on Tuesday.
Winnipeg police confirm that Cobiness was reported missing on Saturday, Aug. 16.
Her disappearance came just one day before the body of another 15-year-old girl, Tina Fontaine, was discovered in the Red River in Winnipeg.

This is tragic. ANOTHER missing aboriginal girl in Canada. Not even a day after Tina Fontaine was found, murdered.
Please signal boost!

allthecanadianpolitics:

Family of missing First Nation teen fears for her safety

Members of a Winnipeg family say they’re afraid for the safety of 15-year-old Pretty Plume Cobiness.

According to a post on Facebook, Cobiness was last seen leaving Studio 393 in Portage Place wearing a black T-shirt with a white logo. The First Nation teen is approximately five feet six inches tall, weighs about 170 pounds, and has long brown hair.

Her brother, Pete Cobiness, says no one in her family has heard from her since Saturday. 

"You never know and if you’re in the city, that’s what really worries me — some crazy stuff goes on out here," he told CBC News on Tuesday.

Winnipeg police confirm that Cobiness was reported missing on Saturday, Aug. 16.

Her disappearance came just one day before the body of another 15-year-old girl, Tina Fontaine, was discovered in the Red River in Winnipeg.

This is tragic. ANOTHER missing aboriginal girl in Canada. Not even a day after Tina Fontaine was found, murdered.

Please signal boost!



'Society should be horrified;' 15-year-old found dead in Winnipeg river 



terrasigillata:

caterinasforzas:


Huge thanks to my co-star Cynthia Addai Robinson, who gave her all over the past two years to make Naevia everything Crixus needed & desired. If the fans could only see the fun we had behind the scenes but also the sincerity of her performance based upon her own past. I can tell you that this was not part of the scene but in the moments that followed, as we both breathed away the emotions that inspired us in our final scene together.
 Access Hollywood: On the final day of filming the cast and crew paid tribute by doing a tribal Haka for you?
 Manu Bennett: Yeah, I was fortunate that they did use my death scene as my final scene on the show and the one thing about that particular scene is I had no [acting] choice for it. It was the one scene during four years of filming the show where I just really didn’t know how I was gonna play the scene. … It was a really difficult one, but then, when I asked Cynthia [Addai-Robinson, who played Naevia], what she thought about the scene, she told me she was basing it on the death of her father. … 
So when she told me that, I was very aware of how emotional she would be in that scene, so I kind of just looked at her in support and … that ended up being the right choice, because Crixus, in his death… he knew what was coming and he knew potentially what would happen to Naevia, [and] following that, she would need all the strength she could get, so I spent the whole time just sort of looking at her and feeling for her, rather than anything about myself. … We do this in acting, but until you totally give yourself up to another actor, you don’t really realize the strength of it.
 At the end of my scene I went over because she was crying, because she put herself through that emotional scene with her father, and so I went over and sort of put my head against her forehead … [It was] just a very truthful moment

#well this is just devastating

let me die

terrasigillata:

caterinasforzas:

Huge thanks to my co-star Cynthia Addai Robinson, who gave her all over the past two years to make Naevia everything Crixus needed & desired. If the fans could only see the fun we had behind the scenes but also the sincerity of her performance based upon her own past. I can tell you that this was not part of the scene but in the moments that followed, as we both breathed away the emotions that inspired us in our final scene together.

Access Hollywood: On the final day of filming the cast and crew paid tribute by doing a tribal Haka for you?

Manu Bennett: Yeah, I was fortunate that they did use my death scene as my final scene on the show and the one thing about that particular scene is I had no [acting] choice for it. It was the one scene during four years of filming the show where I just really didn’t know how I was gonna play the scene. … It was a really difficult one, but then, when I asked Cynthia [Addai-Robinson, who played Naevia], what she thought about the scene, she told me she was basing it on the death of her father. …

So when she told me that, I was very aware of how emotional she would be in that scene, so I kind of just looked at her in support and … that ended up being the right choice, because Crixus, in his death… he knew what was coming and he knew potentially what would happen to Naevia, [and] following that, she would need all the strength she could get, so I spent the whole time just sort of looking at her and feeling for her, rather than anything about myself. … We do this in acting, but until you totally give yourself up to another actor, you don’t really realize the strength of it.

At the end of my scene I went over because she was crying, because she put herself through that emotional scene with her father, and so I went over and sort of put my head against her forehead … [It was] just a very truthful moment

let me die



What Mayoral Candidates Want to Know About Art | politics | Torontoist 

The Toronto mayoral election is more than two months away, but voters have already had ample opportunity to hear their candidates debate. So Tuesday afternoon at the Theatre Centre on Queen Street West, debate organizers flipped the script: instead of the having candidates answer questions from experts and special interest groups, Art on the Ballot featured experts from Toronto’s art and design industries taking questions from the people running for office.

Responding to Ari Goldkind’s question about combatting “culture deserts”—areas where residents lack accessibility to the arts

Said Lobko, “I see a lot of great cultural life going on in areas other than the downtown, however with many, many more challenges in front of them. In the food desert nomenclature, the worddesertis the important one and it implies the absence of something. What those communities are absent of, it seems to me, is not spirit or culture, but they are absent of resources, affordability, good transportation connections, good food choices … and affordable space in which to celebrate and share their culture.”

Lobko returned the idea of community leadership being vital to the success of local arts programs:  “I think it’s most effective when there’s a grassroots, local initiative to create space and bring partnerships together that allow for the renewal of these communities,” he said. “Across North America we’re seeing examples [of this] that don’t lead to hyper-gentrification… Local stewardship is the best way to ensure long term sustainability.”



definitelydope:

青山 Colors of Mountains (by samyaoo)



saydox:

Ang Lee is a good cook and was a full-time house-husband for six years.



Looking for Melayu: Translators and Seafarers | Kritika Kultura  

by Corazon D. Villareal

Abstract
This essay explores literary relations between the Philippines and Malaysia through a study of translational exchange between the two countries. It argues that translational exchange between the Philippines and Malaysia cannot be understood only through a study of contemporary translations since the connections between the two countries date back to pre-colonial times. Other than a discussion of some contemporary translations, the article cites two cases of translational exchange. The first is Pigafetta’s account of Enrique, the Malay slave/translator who accompanied Magellan in his expedition to the Philippines, and the appropriation of this account by a Malaysian historical novelist. The other case is the translations of Badjau-Sama tales. The link to the shared past between the Philippines and Malaysia in pre-modern times is Melayu, a cultural complex that can be understood partly through a study of common stories and tales that have that have undulated in the borderless seas of south of the Philippines and Sabah. We cannot just translate Malaysia as if it were apart from or foreign to us since there are components in our culture that connect inextricably with Melayu. In a sense, we translate Malaysia as we translate ourselves. 



thrace-:

speakslow13:

Fuck.

The gifset I’ve been waiting for.



Angel Haze covers ‘Counting Stars’ by OneRepublic.



karenmilkovichs:

the 100 meme [7/8] scenes

 you have to find the wire that connects the manual override to the electromagnet.



“Every empire, however, tells itself and the world that it is unlike all other empires, that its mission is not to plunder and control but to educate and liberate.” —

Edward W. Said- Los Angeles Times, July 20, 2003

 

(via maarnayeri)



Monty Green is the Witty, the Technician, the Pharmacist, the Horticulturist and the Helpful.